Vibeke Mascini (The Netherlands) is a visual artist and writer, whose research for the past two years has evolved around historic and futuristic concepts of electricity as a speculative agent of life. Often working in long-term collaborations with scientists, engineers, government employees and music composers, her sculptures, installations, video and texts seek to channel a close understanding of electricity by drawing a direct relation to its source. Among the outcomes of this research is the sound installation Salvage (2019), for which a new form of battery was developed that harnessed the energy released from burning the remains of a stranded whale. Vibeke proposes an understanding of electrical energy as a statement our interconnectedness and enmeshment – both between ourselves and our environment – and that witnessing of this can evoke profound empathy and concern.

During her residency at Delfina Foundation Vibeke will continue this research by exploring the storage of energy generated from incinerating illegal, confiscated goods. Additionally, she will experiment with a long-forgotten technique in which electrical current and dust can be used as a writing method.

Based in The Hague, The Netherlands, Vibeke studied at the Design Academy Eindhoven and received her BFA at the Gerrit Rietveld Academy in Amsterdam. Over the past years she carried out artist-in-residencies at Rijksmuseum Boerhaave, NL; Fondazione Antonio Ratti, IT; Alps Art Academy, CH; and Studio Galeria FKSE, HU. Her publications include: The Dent of Walter Umenhofer (2015) and Cloud Inverse (2017). As a sculpture tutor and research fellow she is involved with the Royal Academy of Art in The Hague.

With support from

Mondriaan Fund


Artist’s website

Link


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Please note all artist-in-residence biographies are accurate at the time of their residency. For up-to-date bios please visit the artist’s website.


Related Content

Vibeke Mascini: Infra

Contemplating the British Library’s ‘silent’ recording of a blue whale

Residency Project

Performance as Process: Future rituals